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Roy Driver's family took on a three and a half acre smallholding behind Home Farm during the Second World War to help Britain "dig for victory."

"I was born in 1930 and I was the third son. We lived in one of the new houses in Moulsecoomb. It was called the `Garden Estate' and was built for the people that came back from the First World War. You didn't have to lock your doors, it was all decent working class people.

When the Second World War started my mum and dad decided to do their bit.

When we took it over it was quite barren and the soil was chalky. You couldn't take topsoil up there so we used the stuff from the cesspit and the pigsty for manure _ we didn't have the sprays in those days _ it was all organic.

When we first started we hired a tractor for ploughing but according to my dad it didn't go down deep enough, so we got a horse to pull the plough. We had four horses at various stages. We grew potatoes, cabbage, lettuce, all the usual stuff, but we didn't grow any grain because we didn't have enough land.

We also had goats, pigs, chickens, ducks and rabbits. The animals had to be fed every day and I went up there straight from school and took the goats and the horse out to the field at the back of the wood. Dad left home about 7 in the morning to work on the railways and came up after he'd finished. During the war it was double

Roy and his dad with their pigs.


By 1943, kitchen waste was being collected at a rate of 31,000 tonnes a month - enough to feed 210,000 pigs.

   

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